Friday, February 19, 2010

Let's Have Leftovers!


LEFTOVERS




Everyone loves leftovers....well maybe in regards to not having to cook. But how about fabric leftovers?

Last year I hosted an online project entitled COMPOSITIONAL CONVERSATION. This project involved a group of artists each working in turn on one composition. One of the guidelines was that when it was your turn to work with the project, you could remove any elements from the composition you felt were not working but these elements had to be passed along to the next artist who might want to re-introduce them. At the end of the project there was a sad plastic bag of these pieces, some of them cut to tatters.

I studied this artifact of our experiment and would have discarded them as I generate enough leftovers (often donated to elementary schools and the like). However, I have heard Kentucky artist, Kathy Loomis, express her love of other folks fabric leftovers so I emailed her and she happily said she wanted them.

What could there be about these assortments of scraps that is attractive to someone? Is it because they have a history? Do these shunned remenants have some sort of built-in predisposition for coordination? Is it thriftiness on the part of the interested artist harking back to the origins of quiltmaking? Is it bravado on the part of the new scrap owner saying, "I can make something of nothing"? Or is it simply these collections of leftovers somehow speak to the new owner in a way many of us don't hear?

I invite you to visit Kathy's new blog Art With A Needle to find out and to see what she has made with our COMPOSITIONAL CONVERSATION leftovers.

So. How do you feel about leftovers? Would love to hear your experiences and thoughts.


9 comments:

  1. I loved them! Thanks for sharing the link to Kathy's blog.

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  2. since i have been sewing all my life and mostly never buy fabric, leftovers are all i have left. mine and those that have been so generously gifted by others. wonderful project. i feel the circle of friends has expanded since i started coming here.

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  3. First, thank you, Terry, for the stuff!! As far as I'm concerned, you're right on both counts -- the bravado, and the fabric speaking. I like fabric or even sewed-together rejects that have been through somebody else's hands, because that person speaks to me too, even if I don't know who she is.

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  4. Thank you to Jude for joining in. Your deep expertise is appreciated. And to Kathy, I was delighted to pass the fabric along to someone who would love it and use it....

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  5. So cool, so cool, so cool, gawd I love what Kathy did with our humble scraps!!

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  6. In the tailoring trade any cloth left over from cutting out a garment used to be called cabbage. If the cutting out had been carefully done, there could be enough left over to make another garment which increased profits considerably.

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  7. Hey Judi. The scraps were humble but loveable. And Diana, I love that information about cabbage. Did you work in the garment industry?

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  8. I do feel horribly guilty not using every scrap of fabric I create. It just seems so wasteful! And I feel so excited to find ways of using them. Like anyone is keeping track. LOL

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  9. Only you are keeping track but you are the only one that counts. I have given tons of scraps away because I just have no place to store them and the people who got them were thrilled so you might consider that when you are just overrun.

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