Friday, February 12, 2010

SLOW CLOTH - Really





I've always been a bit impatient. I want things to happen Now! Despite that personality trait, I have always been attracted to art and art process which require patience. Go figure.

The work I have been doing for the last five years has focused on large bold shapes, somewhat spare compositions and lean quilting. The finer details of the work were provided by the nuances of hand dyed fabric and the surface texture created by the quilting. Since last spring, as I worked on my Weekly Textile Constructions, I began to see processes and techniques that I could introduce into my work that would contribute detail in new ways and added a different rhythm.

The video is simply 3:30 minutes showing me in my studio stitching, involved in one of these new processes. I hope you will grab a piece of fabric, needle and thread and join in and if you do, please let me know.

PS....If you participate on Facebook, you might enjoy the group SLOW CLOTH. This is a group that was formed by Elaine Lipson, Jude Hill and Glennis Dolce. They state that the Slow Cloth approach to textiles is process - based, honoring and protecting textile traditions while celebrating contemporary innovation, creativity, sustainability, and community.

12 comments:

  1. I have done, and do, my share of hand stitching, so I understand and appreciate the aesthetic you are going for. The interesting thing about the video clip is it encourages the viewer to slow down while watching....very meditative. The other interesting thing, for me, is that you are hand stitching without a thimble; mine is essential!

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  2. Hey Sue, Thanks for stopping by. I do use a thimble sometimes but in this case it just got in my way. You hit on the most important point I wanted to present and that was the meditative element of working like this. I love my sewing machines but working with just a needle and thread puts you in a different state of mind and I am finding it rather pleasant.

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  3. hey, i am excited to see that you work a lot like me.... glad to find you here stitching....

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  4. Hi Jude! Thanks for the note. Yes, I work a lot but still can't do all I would like. Guess that is part of what keeps us going. Please come again.

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  5. Very nice to discover your blog. I love your banner, and your obsession with repetitive pieces ... me too! :-)

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  6. I enjoyed seeing someone else hand-stitching. Very different to watch rather than do, and makes for very relaxing viewing.

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  7. Hi Terry :)

    Neat video... I'm been doing my own kind of slow cloth, too, and finding it very satisfying. I think we all move a little too fast, and I think it's harder to see art when your life is a blur.

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  8. Thank you to Judi and Kaye for commenting. Yes, the handstitching is a whole different speed. Sort of nice.

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  9. Hi Terry,
    I clicked play and continued to hand stitch right along with you. Love this video. It's akin to being next to you in a workshop. I adore hand stitching. Slow Cloth on FB is terrific. I found out that both Elaine and I have a common friend in Cleveland. FB can be great for social networking.
    Love your work/blog/site. Happy Valentine's day.

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  10. Christine I am delighted to have had you visit me in my studio and work right with me! I was telling someone about you and your blog just today! Thank you so much and I'll look for your posts on Slow Cloth.

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  11. I do a lot of handstitching on my pieces- it is my form of meditation. Once when I was thinking how much work and time it took- often unnoticed- my dear friend sent me this poem written by Mary Gordon which i have posted on my studio wall:

    For those who paint the undersides of boats, makers of ornamental drains on roofs too high to be seen; for cobblers who labor over inner soles; for seamtresses who stitch the wrong sides of linings; for scholars whose research leads to no obvious deiscovery; for sewer engineers and those who repair water mains; for electricians, for artists who suppress what does injustice to their visions; for surgeons whose sutures are things of beauty. For all whose work is for Your eye only, who labor for Your entertainment or their own, who sleep in peace or do not sleep in peace, knowing that their effects are unknown. Protect them from downheartedness and from diseases of the eye. Grant them perseverance, for the sake of your love which is humble, invisible, and heedless of reward.

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  12. like having a buddy in my lonely "stoodio" :}

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