Monday, May 10, 2010

More Deconstructive Screen Printing



Deconstructed Screen Prints



I believe I can now officially say I'm having fun with this interesting process. Deconstructive Screen Printing is not new but it is new to me for sure.

I still had a couple of 43" x 43" dry cuts of my cotton fabric which had been soda soaked from last weeks adventure into printing and I decided to make a screen and print them off. I began by drawing a design on the screen using some print paste and black dye which was left over from last Sunday. I was not sure the dye would be any good but I hate throwing materials away so I used what I already had mixed.

The print paste I mixed with the black dye was really too thin and after I finished the design I realized the lines of the design were running together. I set the screen in the sun to see if that would stop the bleeding but the black dye just kept spreading out until there was very little open screen. It also ran down the face of the screen before it dried so there were drip lines all over the design. I was not excited about this development.

I was tempted to wash it all off the screen but opted to bring it back into the studio and add another design layer on top of the first using thicker print paste. I added some lines of yellow and some of green. I allowed this to dry and then printed.

What happened was a total surprise. The first print was a white design with a black background. The print paste I was using had no dye so the black came from the original design and the yellow and green design acted as a resist. Print 2 was much the same but more color began to show. Prints 3 and 4 were much lighter with more yellow and green beginning to show along with the black which continued to print. You can clearly see the drips. In the first two prints they are white. Then they are black.



Prints: 1 top left, 2 left bottom, 3 top right, and 4 bottom right.






Detail of Print 1


I then decided to introduce a dose of yellow into the print paste. I was able to print 4 full images and 2 half images before the resist areas began to break down and I ran out of space to print.

I am very happy with what happened and I my understanding of the process is a good bit better.





Prints with yellow dye added to the print paste.





Detail of an area where I used the print paste with yellow dye.


My idea is to print a number of additional designs to be used with this one to see if I can actually complete a piece with this. I would love to be able to repeat the interesting effects that developed in these pieces. It is such a different way of thinking and very exciting. I am enjoying the richness of the marks, the textures and the color.

Thank you for stopping by and I welcome your comments.





17 comments:

  1. Terry, love this effect, very batik-like. Great when accidents happen like this.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Terry, these are really successful!! And I personally love drips in my screens, I encourage it because it's just one more textural element in the final print. :D Really well done!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you Jane and Judi. I like the drips as well but I like them best when I can have some control or can make them somewhat repeatable. I hope to do more today. It was just a funny experience because from looking at the screen before printing, it just looked like a smear. Happy I didn't wash it down the drain.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Reminds me of Van Gogh's Starry Night. Great experiment, Terry.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Good start on this new toy!! I've always regarded deconstructed screen printing as half magic -- half I understand what's going on, half is a mystery. The first time I really saw it in action was Angela Moll's secret writing quilts and I remember standing in front of one at a show and trying for a l-o-n-g time unsuccessfully to figure out how she did it. Now I know what was going on but it's still magic.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wonderful, Terry. DSP is one of my favorite techniques. Love what you've done here.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you Kathy, Kathy, and Connie. It is really interesting and I am engaged!

    ReplyDelete
  8. A different way to make marks. I enjoy the element of non-control. Your workshops sound very interesting and fun.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thank you Leslie. This exploration has been very interesting for me and I am really enjoying the looser more spontaneous process. Glad you like the workshop descriptions. Always fun to develop classes.

    ReplyDelete
  10. These are wonderful, Terry. Thanks for sharing your process.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I think these are wonderful and the yellow piece reminds me of the yellow dot study you did several months ago- just a different way of getting there.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Not sure I understand what you are doing but I love the results!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thank you Nancy. I am really enjoying this process because of the balance of control and chance. An elevator explanation of this technique is that you mix dye into a thickener which is then applied to a silkscreen in various ways. The screen is allowed to dry. The resulting image is then printed onto fabric which has been soaked in dye activator and dried. As you print, the dried dye on the screen begins to breakdown which alters each print.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank you also to Judi. I too think there is a connection between this work and the dots. Of course there is the color but I think it is also about the expanse of pattern and how our eyes want to connect things which are in close proximity.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for that extra bit of explanation of this process. It's fascinating and the results are great.

    ReplyDelete
  16. What all do artists do with the deconstructive screen printing on fabrics. I will be taking a class and I am not sure what types of fabrics I should buy. I don't want to invest in silk until I see the process and techniques used. How do you use your cotton fabrics? Do you have photos of finished items?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Sharon, Artists can use the deconstructive screen printed fabrics in any way they use other printed fabrics....art quilts, clothing, home interior items etc. The use limitations might be more related to the type of fabric which has been used for the printing. As to a basic type of fabric I would suggest a good quality cotton that is PFD (prepared for dying). These can be purchased from Pro Chem, Dharma, or other venues. I would contact the instructor of your upcoming class as I'm sure they will suggest exactly what to buy. The use of silks and rayons would give you a broader experience of what the process can do. Many thanks for writing and hope this is helpful.

    ReplyDelete