Thursday, January 20, 2011

Unlocking the Vault



Untitled - Ikat Dyed Wool
Handwoven by Terry Jarrard-Dimond


I remember a number of years ago when Disney began promoting the sales of older films by setting a date and saying that after that date the movies would go back into the vault. Well I'm doing the opposite, I'm unlocking the vault to share images of a range of types of work I have made. In most cases I only have pictures of the work and not the work itself. Many of the things I will be sharing with you in the coming year were sold or in some cases destroyed. (I'm a good self editor.)





Hand knotted cotton roving
MFA Thesis Exhibition - Clemson University


My undergraduate degree was a BA in Art and I waited 10 years before going back to school to work on an MFA. During the time between schools I had become very interested in weaving (like so many in the 1970s) and so weaving was the medium I was using when I began my advanced studies. My major professor, Mike Vatalaro, was a ceramist as there wasn't anyone at Clemson University to teach fibers. Due to that I put in many hours in the clay studio and I'll share some of that work another time. Mike was and is interested in clay as a material for sculpture and as I began to explore the world in 3-D with clay and it naturally flowed over into my fiber studio.





Hand knotted cotton roving
MFA Thesis Exhibition - Clemson University


I began by working with yarns, roving and cords which were tied and suspended to capture light or engage space in some specific manner. Later the fibers became wire and I will share some of those another day.

In my heart of hearts I prefer not to be limited to the title of "fiber artist" or quilter or etc. I like the simple concept of being an artist. Art can be made of any material that speaks to the artist and my love of materials and approaches can be seen in how I work and the materials I have used and hopefully will use in the future.




One artist who was fearless in the exploration of process and material was Eva Hesse and I could not resist including this photograph of myself in the Guggenheim Museum standing across the way from one of her fabulous works. Stay tuned. There will be more.


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18 comments:

  1. It's so great to see early work of yours. I adore Eva Hesse. In college,for me, trying to find great women 3d artists, she was a leader among them, Often experimenting in materials that have not held up... unfortunately... my husband was fortunate enough to have met her a few times...

    I'm sure when you were in college she was still quite the talk of town, having passed early in the 70's... I think it's great that FIBERS made a big impact on you then.. As When I tried several times to interject quilts and fibers into my art it was very heavily critiqued as CRAFT and was told it had no place in my Fine ART college experience in the late 80's ... I abandoned it as I was told to focus on PAINTING...As that was a fine art...
    I wonder what Id be doing had I kept going forward then... I recall having a project I was trying to make for color theory, and not being able to find the right tones of color then.... Perhaps I'd be dying my own fabrics... Oh well... We all have our Journey... We are where we need to be.
    Your photo is great. You have a very Eva Hesse look to you in that photo!

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  2. very sculptural!

    what a great idea to show us your greatest hits. I would do the same except (a) I don't have pictures of the stuff I gave away and (b) most of it was crap.

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  3. Thank you Victoria and Kathy for your comments. I personally believe that the 1970s and 1980/s art world was just a bit more open to materials and process that are associated with craft. There are people right now who are using these approaches that are being shown in "art" galleries and I hope to be able to present some of them here this year.

    Kathy, I'm happy to know you made it safely back from the frozen south....and I don't mean Dixie.

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  4. It sounds like these posts into your past work will be a regular feature. I appreciate seeing and learning about your background.

    I was really struck though about what I think you said about placing (my term) someone into a particular category of art making. I like very much the idea of just one term that could encompass whatever material or medium that you wanted to work with at that time. I do find it difficult to explain though what I do, even to other artists who I think should have a broader outlook. With all of that said, I appreciate that you included your thoughts on that topic in this post.

    Thanks again.

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  5. Thank you Libby for your thoughtful comment. I believe what you are describing is how to communicate to another person what you do in a way that will be engaging. For me, the idea is to give another person enough information to interest them without telling the whole story. My introduction goes something like this: "I am an artist. I work with fabric and dye".

    This leaves things very open and hopefully invites another question.

    It isn't so descriptive that ideas are immediately formed as to what I do but perhaps peeks the other person's curiosity.

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  6. Thank you Leslie. I was so pleased to find the image of myself at the museum. It was shot specifically to capture the Hesse in the background. I miss not being able to pop in there any time I like and see and old friend.

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  7. I'm going to second (maybe third?) the comment on how interesting it's going to be to see and read about works from your vault. Your sculptural 3D fiber pieces have really struck a chord with me. I also find it fascinating to see your progression from medium to medium, but still contained within it all is your passion for line and form. Very cool... or am I reading too much into it?

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  8. I agree with you about calling yourself an artist. That's what I do because that's what I am. I don't get all of the contortions some of us go through over naming. I started out painting then grew into fiber, clay and printmaking (sometimes in the same piece!). I love Eva Hesse too. The three artists that inspire me most are louise bourgeois, Xenobia Bailey and MacArthur fellow Aminah Robinson. They all do such incredible work and they work in all kinds of interesting materials!

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  9. Look at you, ♥ looking so cute!

    Clearly you have some treasures to share~ with a defining beauty no matter what the medium.

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  10. You are such a sweetheart. Thank you. I am going to share more work from the past as I believe it will inform my new friends about my work. As to the personal photos....there are a few more around but they don't have sculptures by Eve Hesse as a background ;-)

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  11. Thank you Vivien and Deborah! You are both spot on! The major reason I'm sharing this work is because I feel there is continuity. I believe artists should be free to explore and if they are being true to themselves their "voice" will come through. I so appreciate your support and comments.

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  12. It's great to see your early work, Terry. Your hand-knotted cord pieces look very contemporary. The photo of you at the Guggenheim with the Hesse piece behind you is fabulous! Thanks for posting.

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  13. Thank you Nancy. I think the contemporary feeling of the cord work is due to the timeless quality of the grid structure. As to my photo, well it's fun. For anyone who may never have been in the Guggenheim, the railing I'm leaning against is not only curved but the top edge leans outward into the center of the open space. I can still feel my discomfort.

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  14. Oooh, love your vault, and seeing some of where the present you came from : )

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  15. Thank you Gayle. One of the many things I've always loved is hearing about other people's artistc path. Glad to know you will be along for the walk.

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  16. Your works are beautiful! How interesting that your professor was a ceramic artist; I think clay and fiber are a perfect couple in so many ways. And Eva Hess was one of the first artists I studied at university - will have to go dig out the board of photos.

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  17. Thank you so much. It was great to find these images and have them put into digital form to share. By all means, dig out those boards!

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