Monday, June 17, 2013

The Transient Nature of the Physical World


Vanitas
Terry Jarrard-Dimond
Stained, Cut and Restructured Fabric
63.75"H x 67.75"W - 2013

Vanitas is a work I completed early this year.  The title refers to the transient nature of all pursuits and physical objects.

Vanitas refers to a type of work from the 16th and 17th century which included symbols referring to death and decay.  These symbols might include spoiled fruit or skulls.  My use of the word as the title for my work is not intended to be quit that morbid but rather points to the figurative forms in this work which are partially formed or have missing pieces.  The work has a dense atmosphere which is created through the mottled tones of inks and tea.  All of the fabric has a layer of thinly cut strips of fabric stitched to the surface and when the fabric is cut and restructured the figures are created.




Vanitas - detail


The idea of impermanence is often at the root of contemporary work where things melt, are burned, hammered, allowed to decay or are generally made from impermanent materials.  This work addresses impermanence through it's visual appearance.

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18 comments:

  1. very striking!!

    will you show us some detail shots?

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    1. Thank you very much! I had to look at this piece a long time before completing.

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  3. 0h.... Terry, this piece is so striking... I love the ethereal figures.... and the the lines.... do show us some detail - (we are such stitch junkies and want to see more!)

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  4. My hope is restored. Yes, please post details.

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    1. I'm not sure I can withstand the weight of that but I thank you for your generosity. xo, T

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  5. I love the fact that you are constantly changing and not content to be status quo. All of your experiments are a testament to the fact that you are not afraid to go into un-chartered waters. Bravo!

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    1. Your consideration of my experimentation is one of the best ways for one artist to support another artist.

      Thank you very much Judy.

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  6. Love it, love it, love it! And yes, details!

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    1. Thank you Vivien! I love your enthusiasm!!!

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  7. Wow, the depth and layers of imagery are stunning. I have been wanting to do some surface design and this really makes me want to break out the dyes. Fabulous new piece, Terry. Thanks for sharing.
    Bye for now,
    Aryana

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    1. Thank you Aryana! My adventure into surface design has been a game changer for me.

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    2. Interestingly enough, I pulled out a big piece of fabric that I had printed and dyed about a year ago to try to incorporate into one of my "Compartments" pieces. Will be interesting to see how it goes.

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  8. Engaging, as usual, and so worth spending many moments studying it. This is a wonderful direction. It invites me into the process.

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    1. Thank you Alice. I always love hearing your response to my work!

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  9. First, I love this piece!Very nice! Second, don't you find it interesting that the idea of impermanence is at the root of contemporary art but many artists spend so much money on archival quality materials?

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    1. Thank you very much for the positive comment. Yes, there is great disparity in the art community between those who are greatly concerned about longevity of work and those who are not worrying too much about that aspect of work. I suppose, if you are a major player in the Big Money art world it might be more important but for most of us, if our work survives us, is cared for, valued respected etc. for a couple of lifetimes we're doing pretty well.

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