Monday, October 26, 2015

How to Size Digital Images

If you are an artists with an active practice you have to learn to prepare digital images of your work to be inline with the desires of each show you enter.  For younger artists this likely isn't any big deal but for anyone who did not group up with a digital camera in their hands it can be frustrating.  

Most exhibitions now require digital images for show entry.  With this in mind here are the steps you can take to size your digital files and get good results.  While these directions are written specifically for those of you who use Photoshop Elements, I believe this information can be translated and used with other photo imaging software. 


Sizing Digital Image Files In Photoshop Elements


1.  Set your camera to shoot at the highest resolution.  If someone else shoots your images you should stress shooting high definition.


2.  Open the file you wish to format.  My files come from the camera in CR format. CR stands for camera raw.  Photoshop Elements will open this format.


3.  Using SAVE AS - Save this image under a new name as a tiff.  I do not use any compression and I save the file in PC format even though I work on an Apple computer.


4. Using this new file, crop any excess background around image.

5.  Under IMAGE heading- open RESIZE - IMAGE SIZE


6.  A new window opens – Check the RESAMPLE box. Change the larger pixel dimension to the number requested in the show prospectus  - Click OK

7.  The image will remain open. REOPEN the Image Size-Resize window


8.  UNCHECK RESAMPLE BOX


9. CHECK CONSTRAIN BOX - Now you can change the Resolution to the desired number.  EX: 240, 300 etc.

10.  CLICK OK

11.  SAVE the file using the SAVE AS function.  At this point your file is still a tiff.  If you want to keep a copy of this image as a tiff then use the regular SAVE function.

12.  Most shows want a JPG file so you can then choose SAVE AS and select JPG.  The JPG OPTIONS window will open.  From here you can choose the size of file you want using the sliding size function that moves from small file to large file.  Many shows limit the size of file to say 3.M so using the sliding function move the slider until the correct number shows on the right side of the box.

13.  Now you can give your file its final name and SAVE AS a JPG.

12.  Most shows want a JPG file so you can then choose SAVE AS and select jpg .  The JPG OPTIONS window will open.  From here you can choose the size of file you want to save using the sliding function from small file to large file.  Many shows limit the size of file to say 3.M so using the sliding function you can see the exact size of your file.

13.  Now you can use the SAVE function to save your file under it's final name.

Hope this information is helpful.






7 comments:

  1. As an independent curator, and also exhibition and website administrator for various organisations, I constantly see entrants struggle to comply with size specifications and photography generally. It really is worth investing time in learning these skills.

    I have written this tutorial Seven Easy Ways to Resize Images which includes some screenshots to reinforce your Photoshop Elements guidelines and also refers to other photo editing programs that are readily available. I have also heard good reports about the Photoshop Elements courses offered by the Pixeladies that are specifically aimed at textile artists.

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    1. Thank you Gael. I'm sure the course would be very helpful as this is an ongoing problem for many. I'll be sure and check out your links.

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  3. I have 4-step process.
    1. Call Howard (my friend, the fine art photographer).
    2. Take the work to Howard studio.
    3. Have Howard shoot the work and make the disc according to the supplied instructions.
    4. Pay Howard.

    Because if I NEVER learn another piece of software it will be soon enough.

    -Melanie

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    1. You are indeed blessed to have Howard. I have Tom who does #1 & #2 & part of #3 and then I size. If I ever have to pay Tom I'll be in big trouble.

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    2. maybe you could give him your first-born son . . .?

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