Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Project COMPOSITIONAL CONVERSATION and Mini Artist Profile : Terry Jarrard-Dimond

COMPOSITIONAL CONVERSATION - Stage One


Today marks the beginning of COMPOSITIONAL CONVERSATION, a project designed to create dialogue between artists and a textile construction, artists to artists and hopefully, artist to audience. Most artists work in the solitary environment of their studio. While they engage in a type of running dialogue with their work as it is being created, often the first feedback they have is when the work is presented in an exhibition. Even then, the environment isn't always ideal for more than the casual comment. We are hoping for more and invite you to follow along as this project develops.


The concept is simple: A composition made of fabric is begun and then passed form artist to artist. Each artist in turn has the opportunity to add elements to the composition, remove elements from the composition and/or totally rearrange the elements of the composition. The components of the piece will not be attached to the original substrate until the work is completed after passing through the hands of each person. The one thing they may not do is to remove everything and start over with all new elements. If they remove an element, that element will continue to travel with the work so that it can be added back into the work if someone chooses to do so.



The participating artists are: Rebecca Howdeshell, Beth Carney, Shelley Baird, Gayle Vickery Pritchard , Judi Hurwitt, Leslie Bixel, Fulvia Luciano, Marcia DeCamp, Marina Kamenskaya, Paula Swett, Valerie Goodwin, Kathy Loomis, Leslie Riley, and Terry Jarrard-Dimond. Each week an image of the most current version of our piece will be pictured along with notes and comments from the most current artist. in addition, there will be a mini artist profile of the artist which will feature a photograph of them in their studio, an image of the type work they do and an artist statement. This will help you get to know them as we move along.

Terry Jarrard-Dimond - Mini Profile

As the originator of Compositional Conversations, I had the pleasure of initiating the work and adding the first compositional element. The substrate is a blue/gray (more blue than it appears in the photo) and the element is a rich warm red. I generally work with large shapes and often focus on figure ground relationships. I love working with color and hand dye all of my fabrics.

Terry Jarrard-Dimond


Joy and Sorrow - 59"H x 38"W

I think of my work as interior landscapes filled with figures, structures and spaces that have a story to tell but which are very open to interpretation. I love working in the studio where you can explore and discover to your hearts content.

I live in South Carolina and share a studio with my husband Tom Dimond. I will be teaching a workshop at the Crow Timberframe Barn in Baltimore, Ohio in April of 2011 entitled Ask "What If?". This workshop will be geared for the beginner to intermediate artist/quiltmaker and will focus on ways to generate ideas and tap into your personnal creativity. Next week's mini profile will be on Rebecca Howdeshell and we will see what she has added to our Compositional Conversation.

14 comments:

  1. YAY you're back! Does this mean I can start telling people about what we're doing? :D Welcome home. Your start is very intriguing- I can't wait to see what it's morphed into by the time it reaches me!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Terry this is a great idea and a perfect way for artists to connect with each other. Good luck with it; it will be exciting to follow the progress and visit with the other participants.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Terry, since I know three of the artists well who are participating, I'm really looking forward to following the progression of the work and the interactions among the artists. Hope this is a great experience for all involved and for those of us watching on the sidelines as well!

    ReplyDelete
  4. The placement of the first element has me salivating already! This will be fun, and a great way to connect with others. Thanks for inviting me to participate.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great idea, I look forward to seeing the evolution.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Our week with Dorothy Caldwell was so inspiring, and now I have added your blog to my favorites. What a great project this is and my mini group will be watching it closely.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yumm!! Look at that glowing color. Can't wait to get my hands on that juicy fabric. This will be so fun. Thanks for including me, Terry.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great project, Terry! I am looking forward to each new addition/subtraction. And a PS- Why is your studio so neat? Scary...

    ReplyDelete
  9. My studios are in three different spaces. My wet space is in a lovely building but my sewing and design spaces are in two rooms of our house. I have to keep them "picked up" or I can't walk. This desire to be able to move around in a space without tripping over something has developed with age. Soon, I may start dusting.:))

    ReplyDelete
  10. Terry: I look at your compositions and cannot figure out how they are pieced. [I'm not naturally a seamstress] I say to myself...that's impossible!!!! How did she do that? DID she do that? Blah, Blah
    So are these shapes fused and then quilted? If you could clarify this, it might end my angst and self recrimination for not being able to figure it out. Thanks so much. Love your work.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thank you for your wonderful email. These works are pieced. I don't fuse but I do sometimes get confused and have to actually sit and figure out how to piece a composition. Generally I cut the pieces and do the composing on my design wall and then begin to think about how it can actually be constructed. I do occasionally have to make a cut in the fabric in a place for no other reason than to make it possible to sew. This isn't really true but I sometimes think of it in terms of whatever I add to the composition last must be sewn first. I find that point and start and work on a "section" at a time. Since my work isn't usually done in blocks, the section may have a very irregular contour but I think of it as a section because I can think through how it goes together. If it's too many steps I write it down. I have taught myself how to construct these pieces through trial and error and worked very hard to polish my craftsmanship as I was born without that gene so it is nice to know that it is appreciated. Terry

    ReplyDelete
  12. This is an interesting project! I'm looking forward to seeing it's progress!

    ReplyDelete
  13. What a delightful and intriguing opportunity you've developed! Not only for your group as artists, but also for us as audience, adding a mutually participatory element of observation that is rarely present in our type of work. Huge YAY! I'm excited to see what unfolds!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank Sarah for such a wonderful response. We appreciate your interest and look forward to hearing from you as the project develops. Terry

    ReplyDelete