Monday, February 22, 2010

Hand Cut Dots




Cut Dots
15 x 15


A few weeks ago I posted an article which featured 'dots'. Some were created through soy resist and some were painted onto the surface with dye. The overall color of the fabric was yellow.




First work using dots.


I wanted to work with this process more but still have not been able to get into the cold wet studio. Finally it came to me that I would just cut dots from fabric and sew them onto a yellow ground.




I began by cutting dots in black, white and a deeper shade of yellow. The white dots were to simulate the resist areas of the original fabric and the yellow were "just because". I laid some white dots out and then removed a few and added some of the yellow ones.



Next I added some black dots but the mix just did not please me.



I decided that the white dots were too high value so I cut some gray dots that were closed in value to the yellow. I inserted those and added more black. Now I felt the composition was looking like a color blindness chart. This kind of arrangement might not be a bad thing to explore but it was too far away from my original vision so I removed all the dots except the black and made the decision to go right to the sewing machine and sew them on rather than arranging them and then sewing. That is how I proceeded , throwing in 3 yellow dots to create some open space.


The first dot piece also had additional bits of fabric applied to the face and stitched but I opted not to introduce those elements on this work. Something else to explore another time.


The original project had featured 'rice stitch' and I wanted to find a substitute for that stitch. After some experimentation I came up with using the zigzag function and that I like a great deal. The image at the top of the page is the final results and here is a nice detail which shows the stitching.





Cut Dots detail


These small works are very charming but I am convinced that the power of this type of composition is in the overall size of the piece and the scale of the elements in relation to the size. I think there is the potential of interesting images which might emerge through scale and repetition. What this means to me is I have to do this larger....much larger. I'm adding that to my list.

Thank you for dropping by. I would love to hear from you.



23 comments:

  1. Thank you Christine. I really want to do this and your yes helps me move forward.

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  2. Larger, much larger ... go, go, GO! But oh what a slippery slope that is ...!

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  3. I like the way you stitched the dots down with long threads in between. I see you have finished the piece -- did you have it sandwiched before you started the sewing, or added the batting abd backing later?

    It would probably take only an hour or so to sew up a huge one (just kidding). Go for it!

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  4. Hi Terry: re cabbage. No I haven't had any connection with the tailoring trade but have read that fact about cabbage twice now so it must be true!

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  5. I sewed the dots to a quilt sandwich and then faced it the usual way. Actually, cut the little dots will take more time than sewing. Want to come down and cut a few thousand since you know about those kinds of numbers!

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  6. Diane, Well the cabbage reference is neat and I'm betting it is used the way you described.

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  7. I had a thought...how about burning holes??? one of my upside down weird distructive thoughts....but you never know!!!

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  8. That would certainly work but I think that's too advanced for me. What I need is a sidekick who will help me cut little black circles. Any volunteers?

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  9. I once cut a ga-gillion holes about the same size as these...hmm, I wonder if we did DNA testing that we'd find we were related.

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  10. Christine, I'm starting to think of you as my soul sister and maybe that DNA test would prove it. I'd love to hear about the piece in which you cut the holes. AND, what did you do with 'dots' that you generated by cutting holes?

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  11. Terry,
    I really, really love the unclipped threads between the zig-zag stitching in the little dots. It creates a wonderful secret labyrinth quality upon closer inspection. it's an up close treat.
    Leslie Hall

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  12. Thank you Leslie. What a lovely way to think. I was trying to emulate the seed stitch from the other piece and while it doesn't do that, I found a totally new way to use the zig-zag stitch and there is more yet that I can do. Thank you for commenting.

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  13. I like it a lot, Terry. The stitches and threads between add so much. Yes, I agree - very, very big. Think Anatsui! You just have to find a stash of dots laying around the way he found the bottle tops and wrappings.

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  14. i, too, love the connecting threads - and the fact that you are exploring the yellow with black dots to a fare-thee-well. I keep meaning to explore something in-depth but have never done it - at least, consciously.
    You've inspired me to put it on my list of serious to-do's.

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  15. Love this-- the slight irregularity of the circles plus those long threads in between-- yum! How did you keep from "painting yourself into a corner"? (what I mean is that it looks like you never doubled back.) I would love to see a larger piece done this way as well.

    --Lorraine

    I just discovered your blog recently via Elizabeth Burton's. I've really been enjoying both of them.

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  16. Terry,
    I saved the dots and have used them for several applications, from using them as a resist, to stitching them into a book, to glueing them into my sketch book. They'll probably appear on top of my embroidered work at some point.
    Cheers sister!

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  17. Lorraine, thank you for your positive support. I am working on a larger piece but still not as large as I want to try but I need to see how this concept is working. As to painting myself into a corner...I just worked by way around my starting point, out, back in and reverse. It was very forgiving. If you are the Lorraine I am thinking of, I adore your blog. You have some of the best links I've seen. If you are not 'that' Lorraine, I love you for visiting and commenting just the same ;)

    To My Sister Christine. That is wonderful! Your dots are leaving a trail and I think that is what dots were invented to do.

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  18. Terry, I was thinking about your dots and your stitches as I headed up to my studio yesterday. They stay with me visually, particularly with the freemotion stitching over the surface. So here's a suggestion for you to check out and see it resonates with you. "Dots are the soul of rangoli art -- painted prayers -- these are used to decorate courtyards, walls, places of worship in Kolam India. Women paint their hearths to welcome the goddess Mahalax-mi during Diwali in the hopes the goddess will bring happiness and wealth." Worth checking out?

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  19. Hey Jeanne, Thank you for the wonderful information. I will certainly look into this. It is always a satisfying experience to know that you are in truth following a path that has been cut my many who have walked before you.

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  20. Amazing and inspiring work Terry

    Carolyn

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